Foundation Friday: Research Resource

An outfit called NOZA has just released a free searchable online
database of foundation grant and donation records.  The free material is a subset of the company’s trove of giving information, which also includes individual and corporate contributions.  Access to the entire collection is available for purchase.

The Nonprofiteer doesn’t promote this service, and she thinks charities spend too much time trolling for grants instead of asking for donations from individuals directly connected to their work.  But free information is better than information you have to pay for, and collected information is better than information you have to piece together yourself, so check it out–caveat emptor.

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2 Responses to “Foundation Friday: Research Resource”

  1. Craig Harris Says:

    I just wanted to thank you for letting your readers know about NOZA’s free foundation grant searching. I especially appreciated your comment ” Nonprofiteer doesn’t promote this service, and she thinks charities spend too much time trolling for grants instead of asking for donations from individuals directly connected to their work.”

    I couldn’t agree with you more. I’m pasting below my response to an interview question last week from Nonprofit Tech News explaining why NOZA has made this content available free of charge.

    Craig Harris, Founder & CEO
    Noza, Inc.

    NPTech News:What are your current initiatives?

    Harris:Our “public phase” began on October 1st with the re-launch of
    NOZASEARCH.com. We have completely rebuilt the website to make it faster and easier to research existing prospects, and much easier to build instant prospect lists from scratch. We’ve also added a folder system enabling our customers to save and manage their prospects. The most popular change to our webservice is that we are now providing free access to our extensive database of nearly 900,000 foundation grant records. Philosophically, this is actually our way of telling the nonprofits to stop spending so much time and resource focusing only on foundations. The free foundation grant records represent only 3% of our data, and only 10% of the total annual private contributions to charity. Access to our database of 25,000,000 individual and company donation records still costs only $25.

  2. Nonprofiteer Says:

    So the foundation records are free because you think they’re the least valuable? That’s scarily honest!

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