Dear Nonprofiteer, If a Board member’s gift falls before year-end, does it make a sound?

Dear Nonprofiteer,

I serve on the board of a nonprofit. 100% of our board gives in some form monetarily throughout the year through event sponsorship, general giving, donations at events, etc. With all the year-round giving, many of us were not making a gift to the annual appeal. Recently, we were informed that funders look at what percentage of our organization’s annual appeal total comes from board members. This has the board scrambling to make sure everyone gives a significant sum here at year’s end. It also has many of us questioning the timing of our gifts for the next year. Do we not sponsor the gala or give to summer programs, but instead save that donation for the annual appeal? There is only so much to give for many of us.

While I know that funders want 100% of board members to give, the desire for that giving to come in the form of the annual appeal is new to me. I find it especially surprising that they would ask what percentage of the annual appeal comes from board members. Have you heard about this stipulation? Is it widespread?

Obviously we all want what is in the best interest for our organization to be positioned for future funding. However, I don’t want to lose the help and momentum the organization gets from year-round board giving if it isn’t necessary.

Signed, Surprised and Scrambling

Dear Surprised:

First, let the Nonprofiteer congratulate you on having a Board that gives 100%. It’s bizarre to imagine that some additional hurdle should be placed in the way of a Board which has already cleared that one. Institutional funders are notorious for always asking for one more thing; but this hoop is a brand-new one.

The Nonprofiteer suspects that what we have here is a failure to communicate*—that is, a misunderstanding of what the funder actually wants to know. If the program officer asks (or the guidelines say) “What percentage of your annual fund comes from your Board members?” the English translation is most likely, “What percentage of your annual donated income comes from your Board members?” NOT “Which appeal do your Board members respond to?”

The funder’s concern may be for institutions whose Boards donate 75% of the group’s contributed income, reflecting a failure to reach out into the broader stakeholder community. Conversely, the funder—which mostly doesn’t deal with Boards as generous and active as yours—wants to know if Board member donations are significant or merely pro forma: if every single member of the Board gave $1, that wouldn’t be the kind of Board participation the foundation wants to see, or intends to spark through its inquiry.

If in fact the funder cares about the Board’s response rate to the annual appeal, meaning the end-of-year solicitation letter, this is a classic example of a wider problem in the nonprofit community: the “it doesn’t count” syndrome. Oh, members of your Board buy and sell tickets to the benefit event? “It doesn’t count” because there might be something involved in the transaction beyond a straightforward check and tax receipt. “It doesn’t count” syndrome leaves Board members feeling unappreciated and nonprofit executives feeling unsupported; so repeat after the Nonprofiteer: money is fungible; IT ALL COUNTS.

And if the funder disagrees: so the funder is stupid! Having money is no guarantee of having brains, and that’s as true in the philanthropic sector as anywhere else, though it’s harder to remember when we’re spending all our time trying to please people with money.

The Nonprofiteer’s advice: call the program officer and say, “Do I understand you want to know what percentage of the response to our end-of-year solicitation letter—what we call the annual appeal—comes from the Board, or do you just want to know what percentage of our annual contribution income is donated by the Board?” If s/he really means the former, then yes, just shift the timing of your contributions in future years.

“Teach your funders well . . . . just look at them and sigh, and know they” don’t understand you at all.**

——————————–
*Cool Hand Luke
**Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young: “Teach Your Children”

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3 Responses to “Dear Nonprofiteer, If a Board member’s gift falls before year-end, does it make a sound?”

  1. Anita Bernstein Says:

    Such an interesting post. As someone who works closely with a nonprofit whose board members definitely do not contribute 100%, I wonder, Nonprofiteer, whether you believe that as a matter of nonprofit governance law, all Board members should have to render some form of contribution to the organization, every year. It wouldn’t have to be money but it would have to be something that’s listed on the 990 form or the like. What do you think?

    • Nonprofiteer Says:

      My only hesitation in endorsing this rule is in the case of agencies serving poor people who have poor people serving on their Boards. Those people are contributing expertise otherwise unavailable to the Board, and while that expertise can’t be valued for 990 purpose it is genuinely something of value. Except for that specific case, though, I do think that every single member of a Board should contribute something of financial worth to the organization. To me, that’s a matter of the definition of “Board member.” Nonprofits have plenty of volunteers–the volunteers who get to govern them are the ones who pay for them, or make sure they’re paid for.

  2. Everything Your Donors Want to Know About Board Members' Contributions - Nonprofit Hub Says:

    […] Dear Nonprofiteer, If a Board Member’s Gifts Fall Before Year-End, Do They Make a Sound? [The Nonprofiteer] […]

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